Homemade Toothpaste

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This recipe is ridiculously easy. If you’re looking for a more natural toothpaste, it makes much more sense to make it than to buy it. Not many ingredients are needed and it takes about five minutes to make. It’s very easy.

The ingredients you need are:

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

20 drops of spearmint essential oil (more on essential oils below).

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

2 teaspoons of activated charcoal.

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4 tablespoons of bentonite clay.

And 1 tablespoon of baking soda and 6 tablespoons of coconut oil. Sorry, no pictures there.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

All you do is mix all of the ingredients together and store in a glass container (I use old mason jars). It is that easy!

A quick word on the essential oils. You don’t have to use spearmint. I do often because of personal preference. I’m not swallowing the toothpaste and I rinse very well, but any hesitation in adding any essential oil is understandable. You’re not to ingest essential oil and it is not necessary to make the toothpaste.

Another good choice would be thieves oil or anything geared towards killing unwanted bacteria. Bacteria causes bad breath, so killing it makes sense. Anything that is reputable for squashing bad breath is an option as well (think your mints, even ginger!).

I have been using this toothpaste for a few months and I’m pretty sure some of the staining on my teeth has been lifted because of the activated charcoal. My teeth stain very easily (thank you, tea), so this was a huge plus for me. Check below for the abridged version of ingredients and instructions as well as product recommendations of mine.

Ingredients

  1. 1 tablespoon baking soda
  2. 6 tablespoons coconut oil
  3. 4 tablespoons bentonite clay
  4. 2 teaspoons activated charcoal
  5. 20 drops of essential oil or essential oil combo of your choice (look at comment above).

instructions

  • Mix all ingredients together and store at room temperature.

If you want to use my favorite supplies and ingredients, check out the links below.

Bentonite Clay
Activated Charcoal–and this stuff lasts forever!
Spearmint Essential Oil

Let us know what you think.

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Fennel Seed

Fennel seed is a common kitchen herb used in several tasty meals. It is often found in varying quantities in sausages. We use it frequently in homemade pizza sauce that we make and can for weekly pizza nights. It tastes like a bitter licorice, but the licorice part isn’t as overbearing as the bitter. Its taste is similar to anise seed and the two can often be substituted for each other in culinary dishes, and even occasionally for remedies.

Fennel seed’s main benefit is found in its carminative properties. Being a carminative makes it especially helpful for digestive issues such as flatulence, colic, and constipation. Fennel seeds help gas move down and out of the digestive system and can even be mixed with other herbs for a nausea aid.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

You don’t need to make a tea to make fennel seed work for flatulence. Chewing on some seeds after a meal (especially one you know will make you gassy) can be just as effective. This is nice because I am generally in no mood to infuse a tea if my stomach is killing me–I hate gas pains!

Another neat fact is that fennel seeds can aid in minor bad breath. Even if you don’t like the taste, it does kill bad breath. You can chew it or consume it as a tea (steep in a powdered form).

That’s fennel seed! Pretty easy to use and its main use is for digestive issues, usually gassiness. I can appreciate this herb, not only for its taste, but for its ease of use when needed.

Want to see what herbs we have in our medicinal garden? Take a look here.

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Extra Extra Strength Deodorant

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Hello again!

I recently shared a deodorant recipe with some tips to make it stronger if needed (especially during the summer months). While this recipe can be very effective for some, it may not help everyone.

I’ll admit a stinky truth: working on the farm in the Florida heat can be hell on my pits. I’m not ashamed. I stink if I’m not using something with a little extra oomph when I’m out working.

So, I work with this extra EXTRA strength recipe. I’m a little limited on scents/essential oils because the only ones I invest in are the ones with properties that help with actually killing what causes that odor. I like to use my original recipe during the one month we have cold weather here (I know I’m exaggerating–sometimes it’s 3 months), but when it’s not winter, I simply focus on not stinking.

The big trick–other than essential oil choices–here is the lacking coconut oil. When I sweat and I have coconut oil in my recipe it just spells disaster for me. My deodorant is quickly rendered useless on a scorching day if coconut oil is used in almost any amount.

This recipe has a shorter list of ingredients: shae butter, arrowroot powder, baking soda, essential oil blends.

I have seen some recipes out there that also call for cocoa butter. As much as I LOVE cocoa butter, I don’t like it in this recipe. I typically have a deep appreciation for cocoa butter’s fragrance, but not for deodorant. That’s my personal preference. If you find another recipe out there with cocoa butter in it and it works for you, great.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

I use my Kitchen Aid mixer for this whole process. It’s sad, but I use my Kitchen Aid more for natural remedies and cosmetics than I do for actual baking. The first thing I do is add 5 tablespoons of shae butter, 3 tablespoons of arrowroot powder, and 2 tablespoons of baking soda to the bowl.

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I insert my paddle and…

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mix on the lowest setting until I get this consistency. If you don’t have a standing mixer and handheld one with a deep bowl works just as well.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Once I have the correct consistency I add 20 drops of Cypress essential oil.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

I also add 10 drops of lemongrass essential oil. I mix it in evenly so I can smell the essential oils every time I apply this deodorant.

Now, you can play with this a bit, but you are limited. 30 drops total is the safest amount. If you add more, do so at your own risk. If you have sensitive skin lemongrass and many other essential oils can become irritating. If you want to do only one essential oil, I recommend the cypress as its odor killing abilities are pretty phenomenal.

Instead of lemongrass, you can do another citrus. Most citrus essential oils also kill odor. Remember, if the goal is extra EXTRA strength deodorant, you want to use only essential oils that kill the bacteria that creates the odor.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

I store this in dark tinted glass containers because of the essential oils. This keeps forever. I have tripled this batch and never had anything go bad. Don’t store it anywhere it could melt though.

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons shae butter
  • 3 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 10 drops lemongrass essential oil
  • 20 drops cypress essential oil

Directions

  1. Mix firs three ingredients in a standing mixer or in a deep bowl using a hand mixer until you have a smooth, well mixed consistency (it will be gooey).
  2. Add essential oils and mix evenly.
  3. Store in dark tinted glass containers at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.

If you want to use my favorite supplies and ingredients, check out the links below.

Shea Butter
Arrowroot Powder
Cypress Essential Oil
Lemongrass Essential Oil

Let us know if you try this and how you like it.

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Chicken Sausage!

I recently walked the realm of meat processing with my husband. Although it’s definitely a process he dominates more than I do, it was still an interesting process to watch and document (yes, I did assist as well).

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

You would not believe how both incredible and gross working the grinder is. I’m not a squeamish person. I can handle most gruesome scenarios visually. Very little gets under my skin and if something does get to me, it’s normally attributed to any sense but vision. There’s nothing gross about watching the grinder do its job. I would imagine most people can watch this without issue. The sound is a constant squishing though. It was very, very cool to watch but the sound did make me remind my husband it was “ewwwww!”

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

We used fresh bell peppers and onions for this particular recipe. Look how pretty they are.

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And I PULVERIZED them! This was fun, but the onions got to me. As soon as I start peeling any onion during any time of the year, my face promptly protests; it’s not  a pretty sight.

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Seasoned for yumminess.

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Then they’re encased.

These are the same sausages we sell at the Port Orange Pavilion Market. We process everything on site on our property and we bring it fresh to Port Orange on Saturdays from 8-1 (we also provide yummy samples). We have several varieties available, and even some seasonal varieties depending on the time of year.

If you are in the area, come visit us. We also do farm tours so contact us if you would like to see our site.

Follow us on social media. You can find us on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram to stay updated on what we’re up to and what we have available. Thanks for taking the time to read!

Calvary Christian Academy

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Christian Cavalry Academy in Ormond Beach took a field trip this summer semester to visit our farm. We’ve never been a field trip destination so we were naturally excited.

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Upon arrival, students and staff were able to view our animals while we cooked and served breakfast casserole and chicken sausages. The kids seemed to enjoy the food greatly and some even expressed surprise at the meat coming from a chicken.

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As food was being eaten, students were brought into the back to view the processing and packaging rooms. My husband led that mini tour while I spoke with students and staff about the farm.

 

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We made sure everyone had enough to eat and we quickly ran out of sausage.

 

After eating, students were given the opportunity to meet with some of our hens. The students were very gentle and compliant when shown how to hold a hen without scaring them.

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After meeting the hen, my husband took groups of students to view our hydroponic garden. I stayed behind to show other groups of students our goats. We talked about how the plants use water to grow and how we take care of our goats. We discussed milking and cheesemaking briefly.

The students got to meet Willow, my classroom bunny. I was helping handle the rabbit so I was unable to get photographs since I was playing photographer that day.

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We discussed how donkeys are sentry animals and help protect and alert the other animals of intruders.

 

We want to extend our thanks top Cavalry Christian Academy to visiting our farm. We greatly enjoyed getting to share how we live with everyone and educate young minds, at least a little bit, about where food comes from.