Growing up on the Homestead

Botany & Wildcrafting Course by Herbal Academy 

My husband grew up in close proximity with Amish communities. He was exposed to good food and understanding where food actually comes from. He did not personally work a farm the way that we do now as a family. I grew up with a family dog and store-bought food. We did grow our own vegetables and dabble in herbal medicine, but that was it.

The choice to switch to a homesteading lifestyle was based on our children. We wanted them to eat well, learn empathy, and work hard. When my children talk about their home life in school, the common reactions I hear from other adults range from “That’s amazing” to “That sounds like… a lot.”

It is a lot. And it is nonstop. My daughter failed one of her first small social studies assessments because she argued that people do make their own food today, not “long ago.” The teacher told her that people do not make their own food, they buy it at the store. My daughter was pretty adamant that the teacher was completely wrong. We both had to explain that the general population buys eggs, chicken, and other dairy products from the grocery store. Not everyone makes it or trades with other farms. Despite the fascination or harsh judgements made by other people, our children are growing into–we hope–healthy and enlightened individuals.

Talking about homesteading life often sounds less desirable than it truly is. There are bad days. There are horrendous days. There are scary days. There are breakdown and cry all day while you’re still working days. But most days are good, happy, and fulfilling.

I am going to showcase a compilation of what homesteading life looks like on the best of days because I feel those don’t get talked about enough.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is dandelion wishes.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is finding the occasional fairy egg.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is when new animals stop by your property just to say hi (not our cat).

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is hugging a 6 hour old goat.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is homemade remedies and bad handwriting.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is fresh and rejuvenating.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is full of 4 in the morning surprises.

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Photographed by Amanda Harman

Homesteading is about more than one family sharing space.

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Homesteading is good food.

I didn’t grow up on a homestead, but we’re very thankful for the opportunity for our children to live this way. They help every way they can. There is a lot of hard work, but there is plenty for them to thoroughly enjoy as well.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. I earn from qualifying purchases, at no additional cost to you, if you click the links and make a purchase.

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